VSGMR SRD

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These are rules designed to play through the great battles of yesterday and tomorrow. They were created by somebody other than me and rewritten by me with the non-hard-core potential gamer in mind, or people who aren’t interested in complex rules interfering in blowing away miniature soldiers. And they work a lot better than yelling, “I got you!” and “No you didn’t!” back and forth across the house!

This game can be played in any sort of setting with any type of small plastic or metal figures. They should all be about the same size. Typical figures can be found in plastic “army guys” or “cowboy” packages, in fantasy or science fiction battle games, as action figures from TV shows and movies, or even as playing pieces in normal board games.

Figures are divided into three types:

Guys: people and creatures roughly human-sized or smaller. There are two “flavors” of guys, troops and heroes – more on them below.
Cavalry: creatures guys can ride on, like horses and dragons. Motorcycles and one-man robot suits could be cavalry too.
Vehicles: machines a guy can drive or pilot, like cars, tanks and planes.

A game can be played with just one type or with any combination of the three. A player needs one figure representing each individual guy, cavalry piece and vehicle. It’s best if the figure has appropriate decoration for its abilities (carrying a gun for distance attacks, wearing armor, and so on), but you don’t have to do this. Just make sure all the players know what each figure can do.

A game should also have buildings and/or terrain features, like walls, trees or rocks, which are scattered throughout the playing surface before the game begins. These can be simulated with the real thing (small stones as boulders, a wooden block for a wall, and so on) or with paper, cardboard and other materials.

In addition to figures, terrain and buildings and a playing surface (try one about 4 feet by 6 feet, like a kitchen table), each player will need at least one six-sided die. The game can handle any number of players. Make sure you have a way of telling whose figure is whose.

TO PLAY

Set up your figures on one side of the playing surface, facing toward the other player’s figures. Some scenarios (see below) may call for a different set up. If the players cannot agree on which figure can be in a particular spot during set up, each player rolls one die. The player with the highest result gets to place his figure there.

Each round of the game follows the same order (all players move, then all players make distance attacks, then all players make hand to hand attacks). When 5 rounds are finished, or if one player’s entire group of figures is destroyed, the game ends. The player who has destroyed the most points worth of opponents’ figures wins (add all opponents’ figures together). Some scenarios change these ending and win conditions.

1. Initiative

Each player rolls one die. The player rolling highest chooses which player takes the first turn for this round. Reroll ties. The person to the starting player’s left takes the next turn, and so on around the group. When all players have taken all steps, the round ends and Initiative is rolled again.

2. Movement

Each figure can be moved once, in any order the player wishes. The shorter length of this rules sheet (8 1/2 inches) is a Move Unit. Twist and turn the page any way you have to so you can get the best move possible. Measure from the front of the figure’s body. A figure can change direction at any time, and once a figure is done moving, it can be turned to face any direction, but can’t turn again until it moves. Anything that leaves the playing surface is dead or destroyed.

Guys move up to 1 Move Unit per turn.
Cavalry moves up to 2 Move Units per turn if they have a rider. Otherwise they cannot move at all.
Vehicles move up to 3 Move Units per turn if they have a driver or pilot. Otherwise they cannot move at all.

If a figure is in rough terrain (forest, rocks, wasteland, water (if it isn’t a ship, boat or fish man), moving up or down a hill, etc.) it can only move half its normal movement until it is completely outside the terrain. A figure cannot move through a barrier like a wall or fence. Moving onto a cavalry or vehicle figure is all a guy needs to do to ride or drive it.

3. Distance Attacks

If a figure is using a gun, bow, magic blast or other distance weapon, it can target an enemy that is no farther away than the long side of this rule sheet (11 inches). A figure can only make one attack per turn. Name an opposing figure your figure is trying to attack; your figure has to be able to reasonably “see” the target – it has to be facing the foe.

Roll a die. Hero guys and vehicles add +1 to their die result. On a result of 5 or more, your figure has hit the enemy. If the opposing figure has armor, it can make an armor roll (see below). On a result of 4 or less, your figure missed and its attack is over.

Cover: If the target figure is at least half-blocked by terrain like a building wall or a tree, an attack will still be a hit on a roll of 6 or more (hero guys and vehicles still add +1 to their die result). If the players cannot agree on whether a figure is covered, roll one die. On a 1 to 3, the figure is in the open. On a 4 to 6, the figure is covered.

Armor: Figures wearing armor may be able to deflect an attack. If an attack is a hit, the target figure immediately rolls a die. If it has light armor, the hit becomes a miss on a result of 6 or more. If it has heavy armor, the hit becomes a miss on a result of 5 or more. Vehicles add +1 to their die result.

4. Hand To Hand Attacks

All figures can make hand to hand attacks, using a hand weapon like a fist, sword, hoof, claw or even tire (for a vehicle). The target of the attack must be touching the attacking figure – feel free to lay the attacking figure flat on its face where it was standing to see if it reaches the target that way.

A figure can only make one attack per turn. Roll a die. Hero guys and vehicles add +1 to their die result. On a result of 4 or more, your figure has hit the enemy. If the opposing figure has armor, it can make an armor roll. On a result of 3 or less, your figure missed and its attack is over.

The rules for armor are the same as for distance attacks (see above). If a figure can make a hand to hand attack, its target will not be in cover, and cannot use the cover rule.

ATTACK EFFECTS

If a hit is not affected by armor, the figure is killed or destroyed. The attacker takes it from the playing surface and adds its point value to his score. If the figure was carrying a rider or driver, or an item from a scenario, whatever it was carrying is dropped right where the figure was taken from the playing surface. Another figure can pick up the rider, driver or item, but must end its movement to do so.

If a building or terrain feature is hit in distance or hand to hand combat, it can automatically make an armor roll. Buildings and terrain features are never in cover. Have one player roll a die for the armor roll. The hit becomes a miss on a result of 3 or more. If a building or terrain feature rolls a 2 or 1, part or all of the building or feature is destroyed and removed from the game (the amount that is removed depends on the weapon used in the attack – decide between the players).

FIGURE POINT VALUES

Each player should begin the game with the same number of points, but can spend them on guys, cavalry and vehicles of their choice, so every player may not have the same number of figures. A specific game scenario may limit how a player can spend points. Any points not spent are lost. If a figure is killed or destroyed, the attacker keeps the figure until the end of the game and counts its point value as part of his score.

Guys come in two “flavors,” Troops, who are the ordinary, nameless grunts who charge into battle, and Heroes, who aren’t much better but have at least a fighting chance – they add +1 to attack rolls. Troops cost 1 point per figure, and heroes cost 2 points per figure. All figures can make hand to hand attacks, but it costs 1 point per guy to be able to make distance attacks. A guy (either flavor) can have armor, 1 point for light armor, and 2 points for heavy armor.

Before the game begins, no matter which scenario, name one of your heroes as your Commander, and make sure the other players can quickly identify that figure as your Commander. The Commander figure has light armor for free (and can buy heavy armor for just 1 point), and can reroll any attack or armor die result he doesn’t like, though he has to live (or die) with the rerolled die result. You can have a troop figure as Commander, but he doesn’t get free light armor.

Cavalry costs 2 points per figure and can have distance attacks or armor at the points costs above. Cavalry requires a rider guy to move, who is not included in the price of the cavalry figure. Smaller figures (horses, motorcycles, etc.) can carry only the rider, but larger figures (dinosaurs, gliders, etc.) can carry the rider and up to 2 additional guys. A larger figure also begins with light armor for free, and can buy heavy armor for just 1 point.

Vehicles cost 3 points per figure and can have distance attacks or armor at the points costs above. Vehicles require a driver or pilot guy to move, who is not included in the price of the vehicle figure. Vehicles can carry the driver or pilot and up to 4 additional guys, or even more for very large vehicles. All vehicles begin with light armor for free, and can buy heavy armor for just 1 point. Vehicles add +1 to attack and armor rolls.

SCENARIOS

A game shouldn’t take more than 15 minutes or so per player – this is meant to be fast and furious, not a detailed recreation of war.

“Basic Game” – 20 to 25 points per player suggested
Each player sets up his figures on one side of the playing surface. The figures have to be at least 2 Move Units away from the figures of any other player. Whomever has the last surviving figure(s) wins.

“Escape” – 20 to 25 points per player suggested
Set up as in the Basic Game, but the first player to get more than half his original number of figures (not points value) across to the opposite edge of the playing surface wins. A player who does not have enough figures remaining to win can still attack other players to try and prevent any player from winning before 5 turns are up.

“Transport” – 20 to 25 points per player suggested
Set up as in the Basic Game, but also place some kind of marker representing an object in or near the center of the playing surface. The player whose figure carries the object back to the side of the playing surface where it began the game wins. The object does not affect the figure’s movement, attack or armor.

“Ambush” – 15 points per Ambusher player and 25 points per Target player suggested
Each player selects a side, either Ambusher or Target. Ambusher players set up their figures behind terrain features and buildings (covered as much as possible). Target players must set up their figures in an open area, or at least within hand to hand attack distance of at least one other figure. All Ambusher players have +1 to Initiative rolls for the entire game. The game ends when all Ambusher figures or all Target figures are killed or destroyed.

“Fortress Assault” – 10 points per Assaulter and 20 points per Defender suggested
Each player selects a side, either Assaulter or Defender. Use a large building and place all Defender figures near it (within half of 1 Move Unit). Assaulter figures have to set up 2 Move Units away from the building. The building can be successfully hit 3 times before it is actually removed from the playing surface. If the building is destroyed, the surviving Assaulter players win. If all of the Assaulter figures are killed or destroyed, the surviving Defender players win.

This game has been presented in the spirit of good, clean fun (except for all the dead guys!). This is only meant to simulate all those great tabletop battles without pages and pages of rules.